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It’s funny, as the owner the Dublin Dog company I get asked all the time what’s the best way to train a dog, as though by my ability to make cool collars, leashes, and toys I automatically have the answers to all things dog related....hardly. The way in which you train your dog is a very personal choice, and one that needs thoughtful consideration. One must consider their amount of time with the dog, the age and breed of the dog, and the desired results you are trying to achieve.

There are countless methods, and each has it’s merits and drawbacks, from reward-based training, clicker training, RCC or radio controlled collar training, negative punishment, and on, and on. And for each of these examples, there are small nuances and philosophies that go along with each.

As a parent of two small children, I can see a lot of correlation with my kids and my dogs and the way I promote certain behaviors and try to eliminate others.

With each:

  1. I promote with love, praise when I see good things and verbally correct when I see things going astray.
  2. When danger/harm is imminent: ie. going into traffic, biting, or all out craziness, I correct with more stern resolve but patience, and my response is consistent each time I witness the error. The result, I don’t send mixed signals and everybody knows why I’m giving the correction.
  3. Yes, kids and dogs are not the same thing! No question. However both learn from experience, both thrive from love and praise, and more patience means less stress for all involved.

 

Bottom line, do your research when thinking about how you want to interact with your dog and what behaviors you want to create and/or eliminate. There are a lot of options, and there are a lot of “experts”, but consider your dog, your situation, and your goals. Once you have that nailed down, be consistent and do it with love and respect. You’ll both get more out of it.


Happy Halloween everybody. Today's the day we're able to sneak a few treats under the guise that's it's just part of the holiday. However, for our four-legged friends, those treats could be tragic if you're not careful. Here's a short list of some of the foods you should never feed your dogs, no matter how much they beg you with those sweet brown eyes.

Avocado- Contains a substance called persin which can can be fatal to dogs in large amounts. Persin is found on the leaves, stems, and fruit of the avocado, so be careful when planting with overly curious dogs.

Onions & Garlic- Both have been found to destroy red blood cells in dogs, which can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and lead to anemia. An occasional small amount would be ok, however one large quantity, or feeding your dog small amounts on a more regular basis could have serious consequences. This is true of all forms of onion and garlic, fresh, powdered, dehydrated, etc.

Grapes and Raisins- Although research has not been able to tell us exactly why, Grapes and Raisins can cause kidney failure. Despite the fact that grapes could cause a choking hazard, avoid them regardless for the more dire side effect.

Caffeine- Yes, that mid afternoon Red Bull to pick you up is a big No No for Fido. With no antidote, caffeine in large quantities for dogs can be fatal, regardless of what form it comes in; coffee, tea, chocolate, etc.

Chocolate- Since it's Halloween today, we should all be mindful of the candy grab bag, or Bowl of Goodness probably sitting on an entry table right about now. Most everybody knows that chocolate in all forms is bad for a dog, however, dark chocolate, chocolate mulch, and unsweetened bakers chocolate are the major offenders. Chocolate contains theobromine which can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, abnormal heart rhythms, tremors, seizures, and even......

Should your dog get tricked by these or any other food items that are potentially dangerous, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.


Dogs

It almost goes without saying that our dogs make us feel better throughout the day, however did you realize that owning a dog can literally make you feel better, as in providing real health benefits? They can and do.

-When interacting with a dog for 15-30 minutes, a hormone in our bodies called cortisol, which is associated with stress will actually lower. Conversely, the amount of serotonin which is associated with feeling good will naturally increase.

-In a study of 240 married couples, pet owners had a lower blood pressure and lower heart rates than did those of couples who did not own pets. (so you may be better off in the dog house after all)

-Children that grow up with dogs in the house, often grow to have less allergies and a stronger immune system than their non-dog owning counterparts. Even with a marvelous Dublin Dog, All Style, No Stink dog collar on, our four legged friends still offer a plethora of not so sanitary surprises in their fur, paws, and mouths.

-As the owner of a therapy dog, I can testify to the healing, comfort, and unconditional love that dogs often provide to our elderly family and community members. In fact, it’s not uncommon for therapists to prescribe owning a dog to folks suffering from depression or isolation. Sometimes nothing makes you feel better than open ears, a closed mouth, and quiet companionship. Note to self...open ears, closed mouth. Got it.

For more health benefits, visit: http://pets.webmd.com/ss/slideshow-pets-improve-your-health


Here's a fun little video that showcases the Roxxter dog toy from Dublin Dog Co. The design is meant to keep your dog active and on their paws if you will. The toy has a clever counter balance moulded in the bottom, so it will have wibble, wobble, whacky fun. The toy is best suited for medium chewers, yet having said that our resident 70lb German Shepherd Dog has been gnawing on one for the last 6 months with no issues. Made in the USA from recyclable materials.


You’ve heard it a thousand times, that over time, owners and their dog(s) start to look alike. True? Who knows? What I do know is that dogs will start to match the energy level of their owners, be that for good or bad. So if you live a sedentary lifestyle, then over time your dog too will learn to adapt to that lifestyle, as will their metabolism. With that comes an expanding waistline and a whole host of related issues.

The solution: Get Active! Not all of us are in the best shape of our lives, however there are tons of ways to get back into it, especially now that the weather is finally getting cooler in some parts of the US. Here are a few quick ideas to step it up in the energy department.

  1. Human’s best friend- the dog; A Dog’s best friend- the walk. That’s right, one of the best things you can offer your dog is a brisk 20-30 minute walk. Not only do you get exercise during the walk, but you establish pack rules and obedience training opportunities while your buddy’s behind (not in front of you pulling) the leash. Use that time to reconnect with your dog and to use stop signs, other dogs, and all things furry that scurry out in front of you as training opportunities.
  2. Get involved in various types of obedience & agility trials. There are so many wonderful groups that can be found on sites like Meetup or local blogs that can direct you to well established groups. This week alone I have heard of two great classes,  one was on agility and the other was an urban scent class. How much fun would that be! One class even had a “bring me a beer” retrieval command. I saw it first hand and was so envious!
  3. Finally try something brand new. You don’t have to walk laps around your neighborhood, those sights and sounds can get old after awhile. Go for a hike at a new park, make a go of Dock Diving, or take your dog geocaching for the first time. Keep it fun & fresh and the experience will be great for both of you. Just remember, if your heading to the water, just grab your Original All Style, No Stink collar to stay as fresh as your new found spirit for exercise.

    dock


Join the Dublin Dog Foundation, along with a whole host of celebrated artists from around the country to participate in Luck. Powerful Art. Positive Purpose. Artists were commission to create an original piece of artwork around the theme of "luck" or good fortune. 100% of the proceeds from the sale of these original pieces will go towards our goal of raising $25,000 in order to help 10-year old Clarke get a service dog. Clarke was born with a genetic disorder that has left him without the ability to speak or walk, however with the use of a service dog we hope to increase his capabilities.Please check out this video of Clarke and artist Edwin Gil, as together they create one of the cornerstone pieces for the Art Show taking place on August 25th, 2011 at the Gil Gallery in Charlotte, NC.


Dublin Dog just announced one of our newest secret weapons when battling dirt, grime, and all things nasty when speaking of dog collars. The highly anticipated new release of the Original All Style, No Stink dog collars set to arrive in early July will be comprised of a new E3 formulation, which stands for Extreme Element Elastomers. The Dublin Dog brand has been built around blending the best of fashion and function, and that has never been more true than with our latest release of our all element collars. Every year we listen to our customers, sometimes with smiles on our face, and other times it leaves us scratching our heads. "How can we make our products better and more effective?" The answer came from your suggestions. The new round of collars are thinner, softer, yet maintain a pull strength of over 1,200lbs per square inch of material. We've switched to a new double bar buckle, new d-rings, all with a sleek brushed satin finish. The other big move; producing our collars here in the USA! We feel we have the perfect trifecta now, better designs, better materials, and made in the USA. Now who's the lucky one? We all are.


You’re at the park, enjoying the sunny afternoon and your four-legged friend is having the time of her life. Then, as if being pulled by some invisible lasso, she makes a b-line to that dark area in the grass over by the tree. Suddenly, she stops, drops and rolls as if trying to put out a small fire set by worker ants (it must be a big fire, cause there's a lot of rollin' taking place). Then just as unexpectedly she trots over to you as if looking for a merit badge for her accomplishment. Then it hits you, like an uppercut to the nose. “The Funk”.

So why do dogs roll in the nasty nectar of dead things, poop, and all things gross? Here’s three explanations:

1)Dog’s use the scent or odor of what we would otherwise find disgusting as a type of perfume for themselves. Many times, we clean our dogs with perfumed soaps and sprays, however that can smell horrible to them. In return, they shop down a slightly different aisle and go for the scent that is most pleasing to them, like the nasty tidbits left laying in the field.

2)The dominant theory is that this is a trait carried over from their wolf ancestry, whereby canines would use these scents to cover up, or disguise their own scent as a way to sneak up on their prey. In some cases, they could almost be invited by their prey to come closer if they chose the most appealing scent.

3)Getting covered and smothered in nasty goodness can also be a way of alerting their pack or pack leader “hey look what I found over here, take a whiff”. It’s a way to communicate that they’ve found the booty, and you’re missing out. No really, you are.

It’s for this reason I created the Original All Style, No Stink dog collar for Dublin Dog Co.. Dogs will be dogs, and that’s why we love them, for all their quarks, traits, and characteristics. But leave the funk in the field and keep your collars clean. Did you know you can put your waterproof ASNS Dublin Dog Collar in the dishwasher? Try it.


A few weeks ago I found myself outside a coffee shop, chillin’ with the dogs and my two little daughters, enjoying a scalding hot chai latte. It’s great people watching, with tons of dogs making the Saturday voyage with owners in tow for the coffee and scone pilgrimage.

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Suddenly I see my German Shepherd’s ears perk up, and Jake, my 110lb lab backs his rump into the bistro table, almost giving me a chai latte steam bath. With an outburst of giggles from my daughters, I see the culprits; two white cotton balls with four legs each. Cute dogs as they were, they gave new meaning to the word spastic. Needless to say, after watching their owner with her 37ft corded, retractable leash, I understood where they got it.

So do the math, two big breed dogs with a combined weight of 180 lbs, and two scrappy  powder puffs being held in check by what I can only imagine was steel guide wire. Needless to say, these two creatures, who were not wearing Dublin Dog collars by the way, weaved through my legs as if they were building Easter Baskets, all the while my children laughed and the dogs’ owner chirped, no hissed at her dogs to behave. The result, both of my legs looked like I was the cover model for Whippin’ Boy Weekly.

Folks, if you have less than "perfect" dogs, you may want to consider a flat, fixed length leash. Many, if not most dog trainers recommend a leash where you have more control, forcing your dog to follow your lead. As an example, hint, hint, wink, wink, consider the 5ft. eco-Lucks Leash from Dublin Dog Co. It’s the Goldilocks of leashes. Not too long, not too short, and certainly not too vein cutting sharp.

It was the best of days, it was the worst of days. We laughed, we cried, I bled, however the chai latte and orange scone was almost worth it. Happy weekend to you.


The Dublin Dog Foundation is SEEKING ARTISTS, who would like to help a 10 year old child receive a service dog. Clarke, our recipient was born with a genetic disorder that has left him without the ability to speak or walk, yet his spirit soars and his smile speaks the truth. Please check out the following poster and share with your friends in the art world. The art show will take place on August 25th in Charlotte, NC at the Edwin Gil Gallery. However, right now we are still assembling our artists for the event. Email luck@dublindogfoundation.org for more information or visit us at the Dublin Dog Foundation website.


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